THEIR Hands Are In YOUR Pockets

Whose hands? The scammers.

How do they try to get there? The Internet is the first obvious way.

They are always phishing for your personal information. Through direct emails, telling you that you are a winner, or that there is a package waiting for you, or through cleverly disguised emails using a bank’s stationery or even the stationery of the Internal Revenue Service.

The IRS will never contact you via email. And neither will the security department of your bank. Do not respond to these emails. Print them and forward them to the real IRS and bank involved.

What if you get a phone call at home from your bank, claiming that there is a problem with your credit card? Don’t answer any questions from that person. Hang up, get your credit card and call back the phone number on the card. Ask if there was a problem that they would have been contacting you about. If no, report the phone call. If yes, resolve the problem.

Have you encountered scammers?  Share your experience with me in the comments.

One response to “THEIR Hands Are In YOUR Pockets

  1. Sound advise. I often have the “security” email for my banks and others so I forward email scams.

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